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it is too bad that the concept of physically separated bicycle lanes with intersection modifications has been discredited by ignorant scum like John Forseter, who wishes that every cyclist should cycle in the roads with the soccer moms and crazies. Anything less than bikes only roads or dedicated bike lanes is pandering to the racing/athletic elities and ignores all of the "other" potential cyclists or those who would ride if it were actually a safe thing to do.Bicycling should not be seen as just a sport. There are actually people who use bikes every day , do our shopping , go to work, errands- basically a car free lifestyle. We need safer streets and more bicycle infrastructure, PERIOD.And forget about the Forester model- read Pucher instead- he uses REAL STATISTICS from REAL PLACES.

Seems like your title summarized this nicely. I think it's useful not to view bike lanes as either all that or as the other extreme. I've always regarded bike lanes as having a high potential for lending a false sense of security; I also think there are places where bike lanes just don't work. But this doesn't mean, however, that I'm against them; rather, I'd like to see them used wisely.

It's a useful way at looking at the entire infrastructure - there isn't one solution to the problem, but many tools that can be used. Bike lanes, separate pathways, sharrows, all the while letting bikes on the roadways with or without bike lanes are all part of the multi-faceted solution.

Wow -- first you take on helmets, then bike lanes. If the next post is on Campy vs. Shimano you'll hit the holy war trifecta.

There's a fundamental problem that most bike lanes are not engineered, they're just built, and usually the people building them are not cyclists -- or even particularly sympathetic to cycling. If you read the DDOT design guide, it's pretty clear that facilitating cycling is not their goal -- facilitating driving by getting bicycles out of the way of cars is what they really care about.

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