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This is precisely an example of what I'm talking about (see my last posting in the previous thread). You throw around a lot of numbers, but your argument is premised on a fallacy.

The fact that Metro was not overwhelmed during the Pope's visit does not mean that they were "needlessly" cautious. Their job was to plan for the worst. An analogy: just because a package bomb doesn't go off doesn't prove that the police "needlessly" cleared the area. (This may seem like an exaggerated comparison until you remember that Metro is a key part of DC's evacuation plan.)

It's also worth asking what ridership was like at different times of the day. If ridership all day Pope day was at levels near ordinary rush hour traffic, it made sense to keep bikes off during what would ordinarily be "off peak" times, whereas it's possible that all the basketball and baseball games fit in enough with the rush hour schedule that the ridership was relatively light during the "off peak" times.

none of the Metro rules should be applied to people with folding bicycles. that would be plain absurd .IMO folding bicycles should be encouraged for Metro usage.

I thought folding bikes were allowed on Metro at any time - that's not the case?

Folding bikes that are bagged are counted as luggage (and thus subject to the inauguration luggage restrictions).

Make sense - tuna is healthier packed in water (sweat) than oil (chain grease).

Lucre, I considered that, but they don't publish the hour by hour rate, still if you average it out over the day, no single hour is particularly busy.

Guez, it is a good point that they may have believed the Pope visit would be busier and were being prudent. Maybe they give BS answers because the real answer is "We really aren't capable of estimating ridership with any accuracy - even on the 4th of July when we ban bikes every year. Our employees are too undisciplined to enforce anything beyond the most simple of rules. We agree that allowing bikes on in the wee hours would cause no negative impact, but our employees just aren't there." If so, that's sad.

Washcycle, you're probably right about the "real answer." And I agree that Metro should do more to facilitate multi-modal transit. The question is how we persuade them to move in that direction. While your point about the "wee hours" is certainly valid, I fear that the argument falls on deaf ears. We need to pick our battles.

When overseas I noticed that there are both subway & long distance train cars I have seen that are specifically desognated for bicycles. We are not there yet here in the USA.
We are actually a very long way from there , yet, I'm afraid.

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