Design Template by Bikingtoronto

« Track Your Trips in July to Help Raise $10K for WABA | Main | Thursday Afternoon Commute - 30 Percent »

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Yeah, I wonder if we can get some service level ratings on the local trails because of the overcrowding. Nothing gets people building more lanes an "F" service level from FCDOT.

@Tom
+1

Re: bike friendly measure,
I would measure a city more broadly on how "non-car" friendly it is. So what percentage of commutes involve at least a leg of the trip done by walking, cycling, mass transportation and so on.

Just to throw some number out there (totally without any justification):
A - if 80% or greater of the trips don't use a car for a lest one leg of the journey.

I'd go one step further than Jeff and just say how friendly a transport system is to people. That is why street parking is so important, as opposed to throwing cars into garages.

In terms of the funding issue, it looks as if just shifting cards around. However, calling "TE" as CMAQ-AA is incredibly stupid and a sign a bad things coming. CMAQ should be really about cleaning up the air, and not the TE type programs.

Trying to link my two argumetns, think of things like highway rest stops and what not. If we had REAL resst stops, we could remove 75% of the 7-11 and gas stations that cluster on every highway exit.

The road congestion scale of A to F or (E or whatever) is a complete joke. For example, the "failed intersection" concept is based on whether there was EVER any waiting more than one cycle at a light, any time of day. But any road that has no waiting at all, ever, in a densely populated area is by definition grossly overbuilt most of the time, and thus a hugely nonoptimal waste of asphalt. The road congestion scale reminds me of the parking requirements -- they don't "pass" unless they're hugely overbuilt virtually all the time. It's an idiotic system, designed to benefit road and parking lot pavers, I presume -- the system has certainly had a horrifying impact on most suburbs.

@Greenbelt; yep. Our sytem is desigend to make road contractor rich and truckers moving.

Drivers of personal cars -- not so much.

This is my bike-friendliness scale.

A = you'd be crazy NOT to ride a bike in the city
B = riding a bike is generally the best way to get around
C = riding is a good way to get around, some of the time
D = you can ride, but it's not optimal
F = you're batshit crazy for trying to ride there!

I give DC a B- on this scale.

@charlie I don't know where you live, but in Alexandria nearly all of the roads are designed so that 100 percent of the roadway is available to be used by cars, either for driving or parking. There are very few bike lanes.

If our political leaders actually mean what they say when they talk about getting people out of cars and onto bikes, sidewalks and buses, they should take steps to reduce this percentage to some number less than 100 for some significant percentage of our streets. One way to do this would be to re-allocate on-street parking to make bike lanes and bike parking, to improve signage so that garage parking is easier to find, and to price public garage-parking to make it more attractive. If you actually want a solution that improves things for everyone there is an example of one.

"We're seeing more and more people use the trail. Thus, there's this quote-on-quote 'overcrowding',' I think safety education is a good idea, but what is clearly needed is more trails to reduce overcrowding.

I was pondering this as I rode up the glorified sidewalk that is the Custis Trail west out of Rosslyn.

A congested, rush-hour stream of cyclists and pedestrians all fighting over scraps (including a maintenance guy trimming shrubs), it sits about 6" from three lanes of sparsely-populated tarmac called Lee Hwy.

I wonder what the traffic impact would be if one of those three lanes were reserved for a segregated contraflow cycle-track.

Sorry, by "glorified" or course I mean "degraded"...

@oboe, since I ride and walk that every day as well, I've wondered the same.

Lee Highway could lost a lane there. (bascially, it gets backed up if 66 is backed up at Scott.) contraflow - no, absolutely not.

The nicest part of that strech is the shade the sound barrier provides.

What is very annoying is commuters who just blow through on their bikes, so much so that local residents can't use the path.

@oboe

Zero. It's three lanes with additional right and left turn lanes. That's basically more capacity than I-66 has from Rosslyn to the Beltway.

Looking on the bright side, the crowding on the trails is largely because cycling and walking is now so popular.

I'd go one step further than Jeff and just say how friendly a transport system is to people. That is why street parking is so important, as opposed to throwing cars into garages.

Well I'd go the opposite way. At some point you need both a carrot and a stick. If we want to increase non-car use of our streets we necessarily will have to decrease car use somehow.

Starting by removing parking from surface streets would be the first step since a single parked car effectively removes an entire lane from use.

I don't ride the Custis trail very often, but when I have, it's very notable how few cars were on the three traffic lanes. If you took the rightmost (uphill) lane for a cycletrack, could you also get rid of one of the two right turn lanes at Lynn Street? The two-lane turns are very dangerous.

What is very annoying is commuters who just blow through on their bikes, so much so that local residents can't use the path.

Right, but this is inevitable consequence of routing the major e-w bike commuting artery through a freeking sidewalk.

If they decided to route I-66 through the parking lot of that little shopette on the corner of Spout Run and Lee Hwy, you'd probably see a few user conflicts as well.

People should slow down and be courteous...but the fundamental problem is--as usual--cars are given the lion's share and everyone else is left to fight over the scraps.

The comments to this entry are closed.

Banner design by creativecouchdesigns.com

City Paper's Best Local Bike Blog 2009

Categories

 Subscribe in a reader