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I know how that Brooklyn woman must feel...last time I "lost control" of my bike I careened through a bus stop, demolished a flower stand, and crashed through the front wall of a convenience store. It's definitely bikes that make the streets so dangerous...

Was it a hybrid SUV? Because that apparently makes it okay.

Those e-bikes could use a speed governor. One blew by me on the Custis trail - going uphill -- must have been close to 20 MPH. I couldn't figure out how the guy was going so fast until after he passed me.

I'd think a mild system with just a small boost would be enough, but perhaps the physics of batteries escapes me.

@Crikey7: Ha!

That MD law is pretty half-baked. If it imposed certain limits on the size of the motor and the technology used, it could be argued to create a level playing field for combustion engine and electric engine two-wheelers.

Consider:
A bicycle with a 500KWh motor delivering boost only when the rider pedals is very different from the many bikes we see on the bike lanes now. If the rider merely has to turn the throttle and go 35 mph and pedal once in a while when he/she feels like it, it is clearly a vehicle not meant for multi-use paths.

Bicycling improvements to Oxon Hill Road would be a godsend. Currently, the shoulder comes and goes, it's a bumpy, potholed mess. A decent bike lane would make the ride to Fort Washington an enjoyable experience.

Bicycling improvements to Oxon Hill Road would be a godsend. Currently, the shoulder comes and goes, it's a bumpy, potholed mess. A decent bike lane would make the ride to Fort Washington an enjoyable experience.

Agreed.

As for the G'town attempted bike theft, I have a feeling I know what will happen in that case... or more accurately, what WON'T happen.

http://www.theatlanticcities.com/commute/2012/09/why-bike-theft-so-hard-stop/3274/

@charlie:

Those e-bikes could use a speed governor. One blew by me on the Custis trail - going uphill -- must have been close to 20 MPH. I couldn't figure out how the guy was going so fast until after he passed me.

Pfft! I've seen that guy a couple of times, and once got on his wheel and caught a draft all the way from Canal Rd to River Rd. He's a public service. :)

That new law will certainly be reducing the number of people who consider e-bikes and therefore increase the number of cars on the road and hinder transportation progress in general.

All valid points, but if we allowed motorized scooters on the CC trail, we could decrease the number of cars on the road, but the question of whether we'd be promoting "transportation progress in general" would still be an open one.

e-bikes are not motorized scooters. By federal law every one sold in the US is classified as a bicycle and have motor limits and speed limiters. They are electric assist designed to go along with peddling.
A single commuter moving from a large internal combustion vehicle to a small electric powered one is progress across many categories. The issue of practical and safe avenues of travel is important but secondary. These need to, and will be, worked out with time. More cyclist = more bicycle advocacy.

Another side benefit of e-bikes... Q. What typical reasons drive a commuting cyclist to run a stop sign or red light? A. Keeping momentum to avoid a start from stop and keeping the commute trip time down.
With electric assist these are not really issues and you are much more likely to completly stop at intersections or slow more for pedestrians. On an e-bike peddling away from a dead stop is downright enjoyable and with your higher average speed on open path/road the trip time is already way down from a typical non-assist bike commute.

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