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Why is this even an issue? In such cases, can't the proportionate liability just be rescaled among those responsible parties that are able to pay?

The number of pedestrians and cyclists not getting claims accepted under contributory has got to far out way the odd accident that would fall into joint and several. And that's even assuming that it is even impacted or couldn't be adjusted for in the law.

Could the Trial Lawyers hesitancy be based more on the view that any partial switch to a comparative standard would soon be made across the board and, therefore, tort calims against a Mr Deep Pockets be hindered?

Just called Councilmember Bonds in support (At-large). Number is here: www.anitabonds.com/contact

Markup hearing is at 11:30.

scoot:
It is definitely an issue. For more info read this: https://www.waba.org/advocacy/campaigns/dc-contributory-negligence/

As a Ward 3 resident I just reached out to Cheh to inquire regarding her plans if she does indeed vote against.

The trial lawyers opposition the bill seems backwards to me. If you changed the negligence rules, it makes lawsuits more likely. And drivers already have at least one asset that can be seized, making them a better target for lawsuit. Can someone explain this to me?

Any change in the underlying statute means that all precedent-setting case-law has to be relitigated. Trial attorneys generally take cases on contingency and get paid when they win. So the cost of all that relitigation falls on them as a group. In the long term it may become easier to win lawsuits, but in the short term it becomes a lot more expensive. I can see why trial attorneys would oppose changes to the liability standard.

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