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Oh my aching back!

And why a chainguard when there's no chain?!?!

I find that keeping my chains clean and not touching them with my ankles keeps me from getting grease on my ankles.

Andy

I think it's a belt guard in this case. Good luck with your back.

It's hard to ignore a bike called "The District."

Right now I carry around extra links in case my chain breaks. What do you carry as back-up for a belt?

As a back-up for a belt in need of repair, how about a buckle? :)

Hooray!

Hopefully we'll see the advent of a solid-rubber tire before the end of the new year.

W00t!

I love the idea of belt drive.

Anything to make the bike easier (to maintain, in this case) to use is a positive development.

Perhaps there is a cost in weight or efficiency, but I doubt those would affect the casual rider for whom this bike is intended.

Good luck Trek.

I guess I'm a Luddite liking my old-fashion chain!

Anything newer than a pennyfarthing is gauche IMHO.

Perhaps there is a cost in weight or efficiency, but I doubt those would affect the casual rider for whom this bike is intended.

Yep, weight and efficiency. This was tried by a British company in the late 90s. First, the chainstays must be split, since the belt is a single unit. Secondly, the chainring and sprocket must be wider and heavier. Thirdly, you can't have a traditional sprocket setup--which means added weight with an internally geared hub.

My guess is that this would be very popular amoung the "hang-it-from-the-garage-rafters-and-ride-it-once-every-spring" crowd, but the price-point precludes that.

Plus the "├╝ber" aggressive handlebar position is obviously for the fixy crowd which is fine but what about the rest of the US population? I love the belt-drive concept particularly when it is mated to an internal gear hub but the rider position is too aggressive with both belt driven models hence my "aching back"! Plus the other belt-driven bike, the "Soho" while equipped with real fenders is called an "Urban Assault Vehicle." That just about kills it for 95% of the population and 99.5% of all women.

In fact almost all of Trek's bikes have rider positions that are way too aggressive to appeal to a wider market except for their bikes that are clearly built to only fill the "toy bike" niche.

Makes me believe that Trek continues to be run by a bunch of bike weenies who are totally out of touch with what the other 95% of Americans might be looking to ride. If your a beginner rider you can either ride a toy bike to work that is comfortable but slow or ride a "serious" bike that is fast but kills your back. Why not something in between that Goldylocks would say "is just right?"

Sorry for my rant.

What about the Allant?

If you're a beginner rider you can either ride a toy bike to work that is comfortable but slow or ride a "serious" bike that is fast but kills your back.

Right, but at $900+ usd, you're pretty much out of the "beginner rider" market. Anyway, the bar position shouldn't be that much of an issue if the bike fits properly and you're in reasonably healthy condition.

Personally, I've always found the "bolt-upright" position with the crazy stem-angle and 8" wide saddle pretty uncomfortable, but YMMV.

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