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And no Fairfax, Montgomery, or PG County either.

However, a crash can easily be a one vehicle accident.

I'm pretty sure DC did very badly (along with the entire region) in the 2010 allstate rankings.


a crash can easily be a one vehicle accident.

True, but it doesn't change the gist of it.

Yes, it does. Your assertion is that crash involving a DC driver is more likely than not involving a MD or VA driver.

DC ranks in previous years:

2005:196
2006:196
2007: 196
2008:193
2009:193

So, this year sounds about right.

I agree the methodology is opaque. Given how badly Arlington, Alexandria and Baltimore do, however, you can safely say mid-Atlantic drives are a hazard. Maryland drivers, a bit more so.

Your assertion is that crash involving a DC driver is more likely than not involving a MD or VA driver.

Correct. It still is.

That DC has consistently scored badly in the study using the same flawed methodology is only proof they it is flawed in a consistent manner.

"Your assertion is that crash involving a DC driver is more likely than not involving a MD or VA driver.

Correct. It still is."

A majority of car accidents in the US are single car accidents.

sorry, I needed to edit that.

Majority of fatal accidents. I can't figure out the overall percentage from the federal figures.

The reason is simple. Washington prevented, unlike many cities, the construction of downtown expressways.

Since we didn't bulldoze entire neighborhoods that meant most commuters have to, at some point, leave the relative safety of their grid locked beltway and enter a street grid full of "hazards".

Since all too many of these motorists fail to adjust their driving habits to these new surroundings accidents then occur.

The answer is easy. Dust off the old plans, fire up the bull dozers, and blow some blocks down! An expressway is mandatory right to your office door.

Here's another reason why I'm suspicious. We own a car. And we don't drive it that much because we live in the city and can walk and bike and take metro more. When I lived in Texas I almost never did any of those things. I used to drive to Town Lake to run or drive to Capital of Texas highway to bike. That's how much I drove.

And I don't think I'm alone in driving less in DC. I'd love to see the miles driven per car owner in DC compared to other places. So, if I'm right - like I usually am - that means people in DC drive far less per car owner. Which means they should get into fewer crashes. Maybe they're adjusting for mileage. I don't know because they don't give us those numbers. They've basically said - these are the rankings, trust us.

This from the same company that released a debunked study of car crashes based on astrological signs. A study they had to retract. True story.

My guess is washcycle is right, that they are doing total # of crashes by total population and it inflates the numbers given that daytime population of DC is 2 mil and resident population is .5 mil.

That being said I think it just is DC and surrounds cant drive/bike/walk and chew gum at the same time

Methodological opaqueness or not, it's pretty clear to me that drivers tend to be both aggressive and inattentive, with an inflated sense of entitlement. It's not a good combination.


Methodological opaqueness or not, it's pretty clear to me that drivers tend to be both aggressive and inattentive, with an inflated sense of entitlement.

I can't think of anywhere I've been in the US where that isn't true.

Apparently Allstate is not familiar with Boston. There is simply no way that DC has more accidents than the Boston area. They drive like they are in bumper cars up there. (I drove a cab up there when I was in college.)

DC cabbies are pretty aggressive. Or just plain nuts.

And someone needs to teach DC-area drivers what a turn signal is...

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