« In Search of the W&OD Railroad in Alexandria | Main | MPD now posting photos of recovered bicycles on flickr »

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

According to this, http://www.bicyclespacedc.com/our-blog/2015/2/11/heres-to-you-winter-warriors
there is a counter at 15th Street NW just south of Massachusetts Avenue between 8 and 9 am. Apparently, all we need to do is get three hundred some-odd riders and we might beat out Helsinki, Finland.

I had not heard of this until this year, though apparently I've been participating on an unkowing basis for years.

The map is cool. Two things strike me: 1) the relative paucity of participants noted in some rural areas, and 2) the factor by which Indianapolis blows us away.

Non-facebooky types can sign up here.

http://winterbiketoworkday.org

There will be a counting location on 15th and Mass NW.

Now in its third year, this is a grassroots project centered around a friendly competition to count the number of bicycle commuters along a well-travelled street between 8 and 9 am local time. Participating cities and communities choose where to do the count, conduct it using a designated app and upload their numbers to the map.

http://www.bicyclespacedc.com/our-blog/2015/2/11/heres-to-you-winter-warriors

Now in its third year, this is a grassroots project centered around a friendly competition to count the number of bicycle commuters along a well-travelled street between 8 and 9 am local time. Participating cities and communities choose where to do the count, conduct it using a designated app and upload their numbers to the map.

The DC count will be done at 15th and Mass NW. Can DC beat Finland this year?

http://www.bicyclespacedc.com/our-blog/2015/2/11/heres-to-you-winter-warriors

Not in our favor is that tomorrow will be one of the coldest days of the season.

First thought: why are Bike to Work Days always on Fridays? I bike to work most days, but telework on Fridays, so never get to participate in these group events.

Second thought: tomorrow's forecast: 7 AM, 15 degrees, 17 mph winds. Not likely to be a big group event, and thank god I'm teleworking.

Better than Monday, when it'll be in the single digits. But most of us will be off then anyway.

I realized after I posted that I meant to type "Minneapolis," not Indy. I blame the Internet.

Now in its third year, this is a grassroots project centered around a friendly competition to count the number of bicycle commuters along a well-travelled street between 8 and 9 am local time. Participating cities and communities choose where to do the count, conduct it using a designated app and upload their numbers to the map. 

The counting location will be at 15th & Mass NW.

http://www.bicyclespacedc.com/our-blog/2015/2/11/heres-to-you-winter-warriors

Ha, I have a longish ride planned for Monday. Kind of hoping the other folks decide maybe to scale it back some or at least take some warm indoor breaks because single digits with any wind is just miserable after 20 miles.

Did it. Not long, but upwind (with the #3 and a single reef, as it were). Sunday or monday will likely be the first weekend indoor workout of the winter. :(

We canceled our romantic long weekend on the Eastern Shore, as a precaution against excessive daytime ethanol ingestion.

Dressed properly and it's not that bad. Had to stop once and warm up the hands because they suck. I liked that my water bottle turned to an ice bottle.

Like Smedley, I may use the trainer Monday since I hardly ever get to use it, but on the other hand, the mud on the mountain bike trails will be frozen, making for a nice, clean ride.

I put "pogies" on the (flat bar, MTB conversion) commuter this year and that solved the hand problem. Last winter, I was arriving at work with useless, alien, appendages and standing around for minutes in the garage, before I could lock up.

I also got them for the road bike, but using them forces one to stay in the hooks all the time, which is fatiguing.

I've thought about pogies. I use them for kayaking in the winter, but I don't like the idea of having difficulty removing my hands from the handlebars quickly. Probably something I'd get used to, but the lobster claw gloves work pretty well down to about the low teens, and we don't get colder than that very often.

Smedley & DE, you guys are definitely hard.

I have pogies, but even so, when the temps are below 25, by about half-way into my hour-long commute my fingers are going numb. I have to resort to heat packs in my gloves to keep feeling in my fingers on those days. Am I just cold-fingered, or do others have this problem?

Just rolled past 15th and Mass NW at around 9:15. Did not see anyone counting.

Was I too late?

My ride is only about 30 minutes in (40 minutes back, up the hills); I think there's a big difference in the kind of cold you can take for half an hour versus an hour.

You might have poor hand circulation though; my core never seems to get cold, but the hands go numb or white pretty quickly since I have Raynaud's.

I don't need super cold for my Raynaud's to kick in and my fingers to go white and numb (it happens in a cold grocery store in July). But it often does take 20 minutes of my 35 minute commute for me to have any feeling return to my hands (after my 5-minute grace period leaving my garage). S0 - I was on Metro this morning.

I am actually a big wuss. My commute is short, these days, and don't ask about my aversion to rain/snow.

There's really no such thing as "poor circulation," per se, in healthy people. It's just a matter of how reactive your small arteries are to local temp and signaling from core temp receptors.

I seem to have developed Raynaud's late in life, but it only happens in a hot shower after a long cold ride.

My hands stay pretty warm in my lobster claw gloves. I carry little chemical warming pods with me in case I need to change a tire or something, but otherwise I don't need them.

But even in Lake boots, with wool socks, my toes tend to get cold.

7, my Raynaud's actually seems to be worse in 50-degree weather than really cold weather, especially if it's windy.

I probably should carry those little warming pods. I always wonder what I'd do with a flat tire in 12-degree temps. I suspect the answer is "jog the bike to work/home."

Wash, that's why I use slow tires in the winter. I am very concerned about flats when the weather is like this. The chem warming packs are a great idea, but my plan is to wave and shout for help and then, when someone stops, to plunge my hands into their armpits.

Lakes are about the best thing out there, but mine are the roadie kind and awkward for commuting.

Any time I have to deal with a mechanical in the cold I think of the story "To Build a Fire."

A great classic. Being a nerd, I would have added the phase of paradoxical undressing <http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/paradoxical+undressing>, but that might have messed up the magnificent narrative.

I had never heard them called pogies before, but I own two pairs--one for my hybrid and one for road bike (the hybrid ones are more effective, I'm guessing because of air flow).

My ride is mostly along the MVT from south of Belle Haven Marina all the way up to Key Bridge. Stupid bleeping wind. I think without the wind, I would have been fine, but the wind cut my speed by a solid 20-30%.

Well, it's good to know that it's not just me.

Washcycle, I have the lobster claw gloves AND pogies, and still have numb fingers after a half-hour. The best part about the lobster gloves is that the two-finger slots are wide enough to fit a heat pack in with my fingers. So I have a good experimental design: the fingers with heat packs (index and middle) stay fine, while the fingers without a heat pack (ring and pinky) still go numb.

The comments to this entry are closed.

Banner design by creativecouchdesigns.com

City Paper's Best Local Bike Blog 2009

Categories

 Subscribe in a reader