Recent Comments

« Adverse Possession and the CCT | Main | The Grand History Trail - A Trail of Two Cities »

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Look at the transition from the nice wide sidewalk to the narrow sidewalk in photo 4.

Thanks goodness that Arlington favors a useless grass utility strip instead of a practical wide sidewalk.

On the wide sidewalk, they should have painted the inner panels a separate color and called it a raised cycle track.

Is the speed limit here 30 mph like it is past this area?

The design/signage makes me feel like most vehicles travel in the 40-50 mph range.

I do like the wide sidewalks and attempt to make the underpass less gloomy, but I get the impression that it would still feel very uncomfortable to bike/walk through here.

I wish the people who designed and approved this area could experience what it is like to merge over (photo #5) to the left lane during rush-hour since the right lane is once again “right only” while amidst vehicles that are traveling 35 plus. Although the road is smoother (for now) the lanes are wider and drivers are going faster. Typically, after doing this, you are then passed on the right by a vehicle that went straight anyway. Arlington used to set up shop citing for this but I haven’t seen it yet. About 60 percent of cyclists in this area are using the sidewalks – that’s not the end of the world where the sidewalks are wide, but to me it reflects poor planning, and it is a problem where the sidewalks are narrower just up the hill. Concur with the points about the traffic lights and additional time for pedestrians. As usual, thanks to washcycle for your exploration of the topic.

I used to ride this section of Columbia Pike back in the early 1980's while commuting to work. The new bridge is a very welcome change to this area with the wide sidewalks. The rest of the pike is pretty much the same as it was over 35 years ago. That means you ride in the far right lane and hope no one climbs up your back while going 35 mph.

Ren, I'm surprised so many cyclists use the sidewalk. I figured any cyclist confident to make it there would just ride in the road.

I used to ride this route regularly. Going east was okay. From Scott Street, I just got in the left lane and stayed in it until I could turn left on Orme. (It's only about three or four blocks.) From the light at Queen, I could get enough momentum going downhill that I could keep up with traffic if I pedaled like crazy on the slight uphill before Orme. The real problem was coming back heading west because it's mostly uphill and I couldn't keep up with the cars. That's when I just rode on the sidewalk and cursed under my breath the whole time.

The comments to this entry are closed.

Banner design by creativecouchdesigns.com

City Paper's Best Local Bike Blog 2009

Categories

 Subscribe in a reader